Honolulu, Hawaii, August 11-24, 2011
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I could feel my fishing luck draining away. It seeped out of my body slowly and, if luck were visible, you could see it slowly ooze over the sand and into SteveT who was tying a fly onto his 7 weight switch rod as we prepared to pound the flats on the South Shore of Oahu, Hawaii.

We have a little routine that SteveT and I go through before we fish together. I usually show up in the islands before he does then I go out on the flats and catch a few fish but generally warm them all up into a lather so that they're ready for SteveT to catch when he arrives a few days later. It's funny, but it's also a bit eerily true. SteveT says he likes to have me close by because the fishing luck reflects off me onto him, resulting in some awesome bonefish action.
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Every morning we would hit the flats and almost every morning he would be the first one with a strike. Or two. Or three. I would get my licks in, but SteveT fed of my reflective luck and piled up the numbers. At one point it got so ridiculous that I offered to wear directional antennas so I could more precisely direct the luck to him on the flats.

I guess SteveT felt bad about my luck abandoning me and taking up with him so when we fished a particularly productive spot he told me to take the primo location while he fished the less desirable area. I began fishing but I knew what was about to happen. He got a strike that ran him into the backing. I got stuck on the bottom.
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But luck is only a small part of fishing. It's really about knowing where to put your fly and picking spots on the flats that hold fish. SteveT is good at this game and so is SteveL. I will go out early in the morning and pound the flats for fish. SteveL will sleep in then join us hours later and hook a bunch of fish with just a few casts.

SteveT, Eric and I had been fishing a not so great falling tide for a few hours but we landed a couple of nice fish. SteveL showed up just about when we were going to call it a day and as I watched him make his way towards us, he hooked and released three fish.
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"Boy, this is a lousy tide you guys picked to fish," he shouted as he made his way to our position. "Yeah, but you just caught three fish on this bad tide," I pointed out. "We're only here for a short time. We have no choice. We have to fish whatever tide we've got." We fished a bit more before calling it a day. Fishing a rising tide is best, but as long as you fish during a period of moving water you will have a chance to hook up with a bonefish on the prowl for a quick meal.

EQUIPMENT: We used single hand, switch and spey rods from 7 to 9 weight. SteveT swears by the Rio Tropical Outbound Short and it's a great line for bombing out long casts and big heavy flies against Hawaii's strong trade winds. I used the Monic Tropical Clear fly line and Monic Bonefish FST clear line while SteveL lined up with an Orvis weight-forward saltwater line. Eric used a Cortland PE Crystal line or Rio Saltwater line.

Fly fishing Hawaii slideshow

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